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Disc Review



Backhand Driving Problems

Backhand Drives
All of my drives end up to the left.
  • The disc is slipping out early.
  • The disc flies very high and dives hard left.
  • The disc stays low and fast but I still end up left.
  • All of my throws are hyzer and I can't fix it.
  • My technique is fine but it still goes left, could it be the disc?
    Back to Troubleshooting Main Page
    Back to Main Page
    Backhand Drives
    The disc is slipping out early.

    Possible Causes
  • You are gripping the disc too loosely.
  • You have awkward disc orientation on your backswing/pull-through.
  • Your shoulders aren't opening enough.
  • Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.


    You are gripping the disc too loosely.
    Possible Fix:
    A firm grip is necessary to get good snap and keep the disc on line. If you are gripping loosely or letting go of the disc you are sacrificing power and accuracy. A firm grip will force the disc to "rip" out of your hand and with enough speed will enough an audible snap as one or more of your fingers will slap against your palm when the disc leaves. There is no general consensus on what is the "best" grip as all discs have different rim shapes and people have different sized hands. A few things that are consensus amongst most pros.
    1. All 4 fingers should be on the rim or under the flight plate.
    2. Your thumb should be pressed firm on top, pinching the disc between it and 1 or more fingers.

    I know that not everyone will find all grips comfortable and if you have success with a grip that does not have all 4 fingers on the rim, but if you are having problems with an early release, you may want to consider trying a change of grip.


    You have awkward disc orientation on your backswing/pull-through.
    Possible Fix:
    I know "awkward" is a relative term and fairly vague, but the main concern I am addressing here is for players that try to "cuff" the disc by either over-cocking their wrist and/or wrapping their forearm/elbow around the disc. Some players are able to get away with this, but if you do not have a very powerful and explosive armswing your arm/wrist will not uncurl in time causing an early/left release. I also can't say what the "best" angle for your wrist and elbow are, but I can say that success generally comes without over-exaggerating any one thing and as long as you keep the disc tight to your chest, the natural elbow bend and wrist flex will occur.


    Your shoulders aren't opening enough.
    Possible Fix:
    If you go through a simulated throw that has correct shoulder rotation you will see that the disc is released with your shoulders fairly open and your chest somewhat facing the target. Failure to get your upper body open will lead to inconsistent releases, in theory mainly to the left. The problem here is likely a subtle one.

    One simple thing to look for is what your left hand is doing during your throw. If you grab the disc with your left hand during your motion there's a chance you will be preventing proper shoulder rotation. I try to keep my left arm tight to my body during most of my throw.

    Anther problems that might be happening is an over-turning of your shoulders during reach back relative to your footwork. If the shoulder turn during your reach back puts your back facing the basket, the step with your left foot during your x-step should have your left toes facing away from the basket. If your foot is more perpendicular and you still manage to get your back facing the basket, there probably won't be enough hip rotation to open you all the way up.

    Something else worth looking at is the source of power for your pull-through. In a "proper" throw, the hips turn the torso, the torso turns the shoulders, and the shoulders opening pull the arm like a whip. If you are strong-arming the throw and using your upper arm to pull the disc through your body will not open up enough during the release point. If you have turned your shoulders during your reachback, this type of a throw will be off to the left.

    The last possible problem in this is timing. I am discussing this more fully in the next section, but a quick description of this problem is that your shoulders are late in opening after your pivot foot plants. The rhythm of a well-timed throw should follow 1-2-plant-whip. A throw that is 1-2-plant-pause-whip will likely result in a throw to the left. Be careful though as the plant must start before the whip/pull. If you begin the whip/pull before your foot has planted it will more than likely result in a severe grip-lock anhyzer way off to the right.


    Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.
    Possible Fix:
    Timing is very critical to a powerful and accurate throw. Fractions of a second count and these are probably the toughest issues to spot unles your timing is way off. A fluid, well-balanced x-step is necessary. If you are trying to step too fast or too slow, or your steps are too long or too short, it will be impossible to keep your desired disc orientation, release point/angle, and timing.

    Throws that end left are generally due to a late weight transfer and/or late rotation of the shoulders. The rhythm of the throw should flow 1-2-plant-whip. If you are finding your throws ending up left it may be because of an undesired pause or stall in your steps or after your plant foot. If you focus on this and find a 1-2-plant-pause-whip you may have found your culprit. This is a tough problem to fix but be persistant with it and focus on your timing until it becomes automatic. Be very careful that you do not over compensate. A 1-2-whip/plant or 1-2-whip-plant is going to cause a very bad griplock/anhyzer problem.

    The problem is something else.
    Back to Troubleshooting Main Page
    Back to Main Page
    Backhand Drives
    The disc flies very high and dives hard left.

    This type of throw is generally referred to as a stall out. It is caused by getting the nose up on the disc during its flight. The causes range from very basic to very difficult to spot and fix.

    Possible Causes
  • You have the wrong thumb placement on your grip.
  • You are rolling your wrist under.
  • You are dropping your back shoulder.
  • You are shifting your body upwards during your run-up.
  • You have awkward disc orientation.
  • You have the wrong wrist angle for the disc pivot.
  • Your run up is too fast for your mechanics.
  • You are pulling the disc at an upwards trajectory.
  • You aren't getting your weight shifted over your front foot.
  • This only happens with certain discs.
  • Your thumb placement is not far enough forward.
  • Your grip has improper disc placement.


    You have the wrong thumb placement on your grip.
    Possible Fix:
    If your thumb is too close to the center of the disc it will be difficult to pinch the nose down. This is easily fixed by moving your thumb closer to the edge of the disc. I have heard mixed things on this, some feel that it is okay to get your thumb over the rim, close to the edge while others feel that you should have your thumb as close to the edge as you can while still having it on the flight plate before the rim where it is still soft. Pressing your thumb on the soft part of the flight plate will definitely increase grip strength and should help distance but you might find yourself needing to move your thumb outwards. If that is the case you may want to experiment with the angle of your forearm and the disc pivot angle in order to get a nose-down release.


    You are rolling your wrist under.

    Posible Fix:
    Wrist roll is your tendency to turn your wrist/forearm during or immediately after release. This usually happens when your arm is moving very fast so it might be a tough one to spot. If you go through your motion in slow-motion, open your hand like you are going to shake hands with someone. On a release with no wrist roll your palm should be facing somewhat towards you. This is ideal for a line drive shot. If your palm is facing down, you are rolling your wrist under. The result of this is an exposure of the flight plate forwards and the resulting throw will be a hyzer. The timing and magnitude of the roll will effect the flight and severe early wrist rolls can lead in stall outs. Wrist roll under is often used on a throw like a knife hyzer, but it won't work for a straight throw. On the other end of things, rolling the wrist too far over is shown with the palm facing up. This will make the disc turn over.


    You are dropping your back shoulder.
    Possible Fix: A right-handed backhand throw is a lot like a left-handed baseball swing. For those that have played baseball, dropping your back shoulder will result in a pop-up. This holds true for disc golf as well. Dropping your back shoulder during the throw will make your pull through happen on an arcing line rather than a straight line. Chances are this arc will lead to a quick upward pull right before release leading to a nose-up stall out. Concentrating on keeping your shoulders level or even holding your left shoulder a little higher than your right shoulder for the duration of your throw should correct this.


    You are shifting your body upwards during your run-up.
    Possible Fix: This is a problem I have seen quite often in players. They begin their x-step with their knees bent, weight low and balanced and at the last step in their motion they stand upright with their legs straight and throw. This will result in an upward swing. Some players find themselves able to still keep the disc down at the end with this, usually resulting in a quick up-down-up jerk at the end of their throw with the same result. The last thing the disc will feel is a nose up release and cause a stall-out. To fix this, concentrate on keeping yourself balanced and the disc on a level plane throughout the throw.


    You have awkward disc orientation on your backswing/pull-through.
    Possible Fix:
    I know "awkward" is a relative term and fairly vague, but the main concern I am addressing here is for players that try to "cuff" the disc by either over-cocking their wrist and/or wrapping their forearm/elbow around the disc. Some players are able to get away with this, but if you do not have a very powerful and explosive armswing your arm/wrist will not uncurl in time causing an early/left and/or nose up release. I also can't say what the "best" angle for your wrist and elbow are, but I can say that success generally comes without over-exaggerating any one thing and as long as you keep the disc tight to your chest, the natural elbow bend and wrist flex will occur.


    You have the wrong wrist angle for the disc pivot.
    Possible Fix:
    Disc pivot is a tricky one to explain but I will do my best. Newer players often think that the disc will leave your hand exactly as it is at the point of release. This is true if you are letting go of the disc, but a correct grip and throw will have the disc ripping out of your hand by pivoting off between your last finger on the rim and your thumb. You can simulate this by holding the disc with your grip and pulling it slowly out of your hand. Pause at the last place you find your hand touching and that is your disc pivot point. Notice how the disc lurches a little upwards and to the left. If you hold the disc "flat" as it enters the pivot, the resulting up/left lurch will pull the nose up slightly. To have the disc pivot off with a nose-down angle, you will want to either press the disc down lower at your pivot point or raise the back end up a little bit. Both should give the same result, they are just a different way of thinking about it. You can experiment with angle by simulating a disc pivot and with a little practice you should be able to find the angle that works best for you to keep the nose down.


    Your run up is too fast for your mechanics.
    Possible Fix:
    Make sure you aren't moving forwards too fast during your x-step. Find a speed that is comfortable for you and gives you time to execute all parts of your throw smoothly. Often players will try to run into their x-step and find themselves rushed to get everything happening at the right time. A common result of this is being out of control during the reach back and pull through. If you are moving too fast during this portion of your throw you will not be able to concentrate on keeping disc orentation, angle, etc. and often a smooth line is lost. This is a tough one to pick out as you will be moving very quickly and this won't feel obvious. A way of checking this would be to practice your throw with a very slow x-step and gradually working your way up to a speed that you can manage. Don't slow down too much though as you still need to get your body moving forwards to ensure a proper weight transfer to your front pivot foot.


    You are pulling the disc at an upwards trajectory.
    Possible Fix:
    I almost omitted this one since on its own it's an easy to spot and easy to conceptualize a fix. Just do your best to keep the disc on a flat plane throughout the throw. Keep in mind it is VERY likely that something else is causing this problem other than just an upwards pull-through. I suggest going back and reading other possible causes if you have found yourself unable to keep the disc flat.


    You aren't getting your weight shifted over your front foot.
    Possible Fix:
    The mechanics of a throw are tricky and balance is very important when it comes to velocity vectors and the direction of your power. If you are throwing with your weight behind your plant foot the trajectory of your throw will contain upward vectors and cause a tendency to get the nose up or rob you of the power needed to flatten a hyzer or throw for max distance. There are several top pros that throw without having their weight over their plant foot but they also have the luxury of many years of practice and have developed ways of countering the vectors such as leaning their upper body in a certain direction or contorting their legs. These results are not typical. The average golfer is more likely to experience many throws that they'd rather avoid and in worse scenarios, knee or other injuries.

    There are some easy fixes for getting a proper weight shift. Some of them are direct and others are biproducts. The easiest is to stay light and quick on your cross step (this is the left foot for a rhbh thrower). This should help keep your momentum moving forwards and carry your upper body over your pivot foot. If you do not find this effective, try focusing on planting the ball of your pivot foot at 45 degrees from your target and bend your knee. This will explode your hips through naturally and force your body weight onto your plant foot without an increase in the speed of your x-step. If neither of these are effective, try going through your throw in slow motion and do whatever you can to get your body over. Throwers with serious knee problems may need to find another method to counter the upward vectors if your knee is not strong enough to handle your full body weight on a pivot.


    This only happens with certain discs
    Possible Fix:
    Discs vary with rim shapes, widths, and depths. Player's hand sizes vary from person to person. Players with smaller hands are going to have more trouble getting the nose down on certain discs than many other players but there are a few things to look for that gives a disc a higher propensity for nose up release. Discs with very wide rims make it more difficult to pinch the nose down between your thumb and index finger since more finger is required to get around the edge of the disc. The Firebird, Valkyrie, Archangel, Predator, as well as many other high speed sharp-nosed drivers have quite a wide rim and have a higher propensity for a nose up flight. If you can throw some of the older high speed drivers very well but struggle with getting the nose down on the newer drivers on the market, focusing on ways to get the nose down or selecting discs based on rim dimensions may be a good course of action.


    Your thumb placement is not far enough forward.
    Possible Fix:
    Your thumb pressure and its pinch with the index finger is one of the important factors in controlling nose angle. If you are having trouble getting the nose down on your throws, you may want to try moving your thumb pressure forward. This "forward" refers to the relative placement of the pressure point of the thumb. If your thumb is directly opposed to your index finger's contact point, moving the thumb forward will move the pressure point of the thumb beyond the index finger's point of contact while keeping the thumb the same distance from the edge of the disc. The forward pressure will aid in pushing the nose down during the disc pivot.


    Your grip has improper disc placement.
    Possible Fix:
    Your grip should have the edge of the disc going down the seam of your hand in your lower palm's natural central crease. If the disc's contact point is under the seam there will be a tendency for the back edge to dip at the release point. The result of this will be an exposure of the underside of the flight plate and it is likely the disc will fly high and with a hyzer line. Getting the disc to rest in the seam of your hand may take some grip modification to achieve, especially if you have small hands, but this is one of the important fundamentals that will have an effect on your consistency.

    The problem is something else.
    Back to Troubleshooting Main Page
    Back to Main Page
    Backhand Drives
    The disc stays low and flat but I still end up left.

    This one is a trickier one as it's probably something relatively small. If you are keeping the disc low and fairly straight your form probably will need very little adjustment.

    Possible Causes
  • You have too much hyzer angle on the disc.
  • You have a slight wrist roll under.
  • The steps of your run up are too short or too long.
  • The angle of your run up is causing hyzer tendency.
  • Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.
  • You are throwing too overstable a disc.


    You have too much hyzer angle on the disc.
    Possible Fix:
    If you are throwing a hyzer that almost or barely flattens and then tails back to the left you could probably get a straighter, longer flight by releasing with a bit less hyzer angle or by throwing a disc that isn't as overstable. If you are trying to correct the amount of hyzer, be sure to pay attention to the disc pivot to find the angle that works for you and to avoid other related problems.


    You have a slight wrist roll under.
    Possible Fix:
    Wrist roll is your tendency to turn your wrist/forearm during or immediately after release. This usually happens when your arm is moving very fast so it might be a tough one to spot. If you go through your motion in slow-motion, open your hand like you are going to shake hands with someone. On a release with no wrist roll your palm should be facing somewhat towards you. This is ideal for a line drive shot. If your palm is facing down, you are rolling your wrist under. The result of this is an exposure of the flight plate forwards and the resulting throw will be a hyzer. The timing and magnitude of the roll will effect the flight and severe early wrist rolls can lead in stall outs. Wrist roll under is often used on a throw like a knife hyzer, but it won't work for a straight throw. On the other end of things, rolling the wrist too far over is shown with the palm facing up. This will make the disc turn over.

    Chances are if your drives are staying low and flying somewhat straight, your wrist roll isn't quite as extreme as I've illustrated above. Concentrating on keeping your release plane flat should correct this problem, but try not to focus too much on it as it may throw off other parts of your game.


    The steps of your run up are too short or too long.
    Possible Fix:
    During the x-step, it is critical for your body to maintain maximum balance and have your weight centered or shifting where it needs to be at all times. If the steps of your x-step are too short, you might find yourself accurate but low on power and discs will fade out more easily. If your steps are too long, you will probably lose your accuracy and power as your body will not be able to center itself properly during your plant. Practice will help you find your happy medium.


    The angle of your run up is causing hyzer tendency.
    Possible Fix:
    The line your steps take during your x-step is very important based upon what type of shot you want to throw. Walk through your x-step and see how far you move to either side while you step forwards. If you are starting back and left and finishing forwards and right this could be the problem as this is the line that makes it easier to throw hyzers. You could correct this by trying to keep your body centered on the teepad as you go through your x-step. If you are staying centered during your x-step and you are still having problems, you might want to try going from back right to front left. This is the angle used for turnover shots but many players also use it to flatten out hyzers.


    Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.
    Possible Fix:
    Timing is very critical to a powerful and accurate throw. Fractions of a second count and these are probably the toughest issues to spot unles your timing is way off. A fluid, well-balanced x-step is necessary. If you are trying to step too fast or too slow, or your steps are too long or too short, it will be impossible to keep your desired disc orientation, release point/angle, and timing.

    Throws that end noticably left are generally due to a late weight transfer and/or late rotation of the shoulders. The rhythm of the throw should flow 1-2-plant-whip. If you are finding your throws ending up left it may be because of an undesired pause or stall in your steps or after your plant foot. If you focus on this and find a 1-2-plant-pause-whip you may have found your culprit. This is a tough problem to fix but be persistant with it and focus on your timing until it becomes automatic. Be very careful that you do not over compensate. A 1-2-whip/plant or 1-2-whip-plant is going to cause a very bad griplock/anhyzer problem.


    You are throwing too overstable a disc.
    Possible Fix:
    This one is probably the easiest of the fixes as it only requires new equipment. If you are throwing a disc that is quite overstable, such as a Viper, Whippet, Banshee, Firebird, Ram, EXP1, Xtra, Xtreme, X-Clone, Blaze, Demon, or Scout, these are supposed to end hard left. If your discs are too heavy this may also be the case. I often see players carrying 175-180g discs without having the power to throw them straight. Make sure your discs are in a weight managable to your power. Disc stability is very relative to power and here I'll try to give some little rules of thumb. Feel free to break these rules as these are only my recommendations/opinions.
  • If you are throwing less than 150 feet, try throwing larger diameter understable discs with good glide. These are often midrange or old-school discs.
  • If you are throwing 150-250 feet, try throwing the easier to control stable to understable drivers.
  • If you are throwing over 250 feet, you should be able to throw most of the stable to slightly overstable drivers currently available.

    The problem is something else.
    Back to Troubleshooting Main Page
    Back to Main Page
    Backhand Drives
    All of my throws are hyzer and I can't fix it.

    This might seem like a problem if the disc doesn't fly straight, but as you increase your power level you will find that hyzers that flatten out are the straightest flyers out there. Many of the causes of hyzer tendency is also the cause of other problems in case this seems redundant if you have read other sections of this page.

    Possible Causes
  • You have too much hyzer angle on the disc.
  • You are rolling your wrist under.
  • The angle of your run up is causing hyzer tendency.
  • Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.
  • You are bending too much at the waist.
  • You are throwing too overstable a disc.
  • You aren't getting your weight shifted over your front foot.
  • Your grip has improper thumb pressure.
  • Your thumb placement is not far enough forward.
  • Your grip has improper disc placement.


    You have too much hyzer angle on the disc.
    Possible Fix:
    If you are throwing a hyzer that almost or barely flattens and then tails back to the left you could probably get a straighter, longer flight by releasing with a bit less hyzer angle or by throwing a disc that isn't as overstable. If you are trying to correct the amount of hyzer, be sure to pay attention to the disc pivot to find the angle that works for you and to avoid other related problems.


    You are rolling your wrist under.

    Posible Fix:
    Wrist roll is your tendency to turn your wrist/forearm during or immediately after release. This usually happens when your arm is moving very fast so it might be a tough one to spot. If you go through your motion in slow-motion, open your hand like you are going to shake hands with someone. On a release with no wrist roll your palm should be facing somewhat towards you. This is ideal for a line drive shot. If your palm is facing down, you are rolling your wrist under. The result of this is an exposure of the flight plate forwards and the resulting throw will be a hyzer. The timing and magnitude of the roll will effect the flight and severe early wrist rolls can lead in stall outs. Wrist roll under is often used on a throw like a knife hyzer, but it won't work for a straight throw. On the other end of things, rolling the wrist too far over is shown with the palm facing up. This will make the disc turn over.


    The angle of your run up is causing hyzer tendency.
    Possible Fix:
    The line your steps take during your x-step is very important based upon what type of shot you want to throw. Walk through your x-step and see how far you move to either side while you step forwards. If you are starting back and left and finishing forwards and right this could be the problem as this is the line that makes it easier to throw hyzers. You could correct this by trying to keep your body centered on the teepad as you go through your x-step. If you are staying centered during your x-step and you are still having problems, you might want to try going from back right to front left. This is the angle used for turnover shots but many players also use it to flatten out hyzers.


    Your timing between the footwork and pull-through are off.
    Possible Fix:
    Timing is very critical to a powerful and accurate throw. Fractions of a second count and these are probably the toughest issues to spot unles your timing is way off. A fluid, well-balanced x-step is necessary. If you are trying to step too fast or too slow, or your steps are too long or too short, it will be impossible to keep your desired disc orientation, release point/angle, and timing.

    Throws that end noticably left are generally due to a late weight transfer and/or late rotation of the shoulders. The rhythm of the throw should flow 1-2-plant-whip. If you are finding your throws ending up left it may be because of an undesired pause or stall in your steps or after your plant foot. If you focus on this and find a 1-2-plant-pause-whip you may have found your culprit. This is a tough problem to fix but be persistant with it and focus on your timing until it becomes automatic. Be very careful that you do not over compensate. A 1-2-whip/plant or 1-2-whip-plant is going to cause a very bad griplock/anhyzer problem.


    You are bending too much at the waist.
    Possible Fix:
    This can also be read as "you have your front shoulder too low." If you have your right shoulder noticably lower than your left shoulder, this will bend you at the waist and result in a hyzer tendency. Just for the record, this bend at the waist is considered to be proper hyzer form but if you are trying to correct that, you should pay attention to your shoulders. Keeping the disc higher throughout the throw will also help straighten out any over bending you might have. Be careful that you don't over-compensate by leaning back as this will result in an anhyzer tendency.


    You are throwing too overstable a disc.
    Possible Fix:
    This one is probably the easiest of the fixes as it only requires new equipment. If you are throwing a disc that is quite overstable, such as a Viper, Whippet, Banshee, Firebird, Ram, EXP1, Xtra, Xtreme, X-Clone, Blaze, Demon, or Scout, these are supposed to end hard left. If your discs are too heavy this may also be the case. I often see players carrying 175-180g discs without having the power to throw them straight. Make sure your discs are in a weight managable to your power. Disc stability is very relative to power and here I'll try to give some little rules of thumb. Feel free to break these rules as these are only my recommendations/opinions.
  • If you are throwing less than 150 feet, try throwing larger diameter understable discs with good glide. These are often midrange or old-school discs.
  • If you are throwing 150-250 feet, try throwing the easier to control stable to understable drivers.
  • If you are throwing over 250 feet, you should be able to throw most of the stable to slightly overstable drivers currently available.


    You aren't getting your weight shifted over your front foot.
    Possible Fix:
    The mechanics of a throw are tricky and balance is very important when it comes to velocity vectors and the direction of your power. If you are throwing with your weight behind your plant foot the trajectory of your throw will contain upward vectors and cause a tendency to get the nose up or rob you of the power needed to flatten a hyzer or throw for max distance. There are several top pros that throw without having their weight over their plant foot but they also have the luxury of many years of practice and have developed ways of countering the vectors such as leaning their upper body in a certain direction or contorting their legs. These results are not typical. The average golfer is more likely to experience many throws that they'd rather avoid and in worse scenarios, knee or other injuries.

    There are some easy fixes for getting a proper weight shift. Some of them are direct and others are biproducts. The easiest is to stay light and quick on your cross step (this is the left foot for a rhbh thrower). This should help keep your momentum moving forwards and carry your upper body over your pivot foot. If you do not find this effective, try focusing on planting the ball of your pivot foot at 45 degrees from your target and bend your knee. This will explode your hips through naturally and force your body weight onto your plant foot without an increase in the speed of your x-step. If neither of these are effective, try going through your throw in slow motion and do whatever you can to get your body over. Throwers with serious knee problems may need to find another method to counter the upward vectors if your knee is not strong enough to handle your full body weight on a pivot.


    Your grip has improper thumb pressure.
    Possible Fix:
    A solid, strong grip will have pressure between the index finger and the ball of your thumb or lower (between the ball of the thumb and the joint). A common grip problem is applying thumb pressure with the very tip of the thumb. Not only is this grip weaker but it also causes the pressure to be applied at an angle that will effect the disc orientation at the release. The end result is a dipping of the back and outter edges of the disc resulting in a nose up and hyzer release. Changing your thumb pressure to having your thumb more flat and pressure from the ball of your thumb or lower should help to achieve a nose down release on your desired angle.


    Your thumb placement is not far enough forward.
    Possible Fix:
    Your thumb pressure and its pinch with the index finger is one of the important factors in controlling nose angle. If you are having trouble getting the nose down on your throws, you may want to try moving your thumb pressure forward. This "forward" refers to the relative placement of the pressure point of the thumb. If your thumb is directly opposed to your index finger's contact point, moving the thumb forward will move the pressure point of the thumb beyond the index finger's point of contact while keeping the thumb the same distance from the edge of the disc. The forward pressure will aid in pushing the nose down during the disc pivot.


    Your grip has improper disc placement.
    Possible Fix:
    Your grip should have the edge of the disc going down the seam of your hand in your lower palm's natural central crease. If the disc's contact point is under the seam there will be a tendency for the back edge to dip at the release point. The result of this will be an exposure of the underside of the flight plate and it is likely the disc will fly high and with a hyzer line. Getting the disc to rest in the seam of your hand may take some grip modification to achieve, especially if you have small hands, but this is one of the important fundamentals that will have an effect on your consistency.

    The problem is something else.
    Back to Troubleshooting Main Page
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