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Disc Review



Putting Problems

Putting
I can't seem to get enough power on my putts.
  • I try to put more muscle into it on longer putts.
  • My stance and form do not include a weight shift.
  • My putt doesn't feel like a quick motion.
  • My putts keep pulling up short and to the left.

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    Putting
    I try to put more muscle into it on longer putts.

    Possible Causes
  • You aren't taking advantage of a weight shift.
  • Your putting form doesn't accelerate the disc.


    You aren't taking advantage of a weight shift
    Possible Fix:
    Most of the better pro putters endorse a quick pitch or flick to achieve an accurate putt line. The flick is very quick at all distances. The power of these putts comes from a weight shift. On a traditional putting stance more distance is achieved by rocking from your back left foot to your right front foot with a well timed flick. Longer putts require a larger weight shift with the same quick flick. Straddle putters achieve this weight shift by rocking from their heels to the balls of their feet and pushing their legs into the ground. If you are muscling the putt you aren't able to get the quick flick on the disc and you lose it's straight up and down trajectory. The more muscle you put into it the less you can accelerate the disc. Adding power by increasing weight shift is the generally accepted method and it allows players to run putts from very far out by the use of an extreme weight shift and/or jump putt.


    Your putting form doesn't accelerate the disc.
    Possible Fix:
    If you try to strong-arm a putt it is the same as strong-arming a throw. Force on the disc is given by Mass x Acceleration. The slower speed of a muscled putt will putt very little acceleration on the disc. A quick pitch or flick of the arm paired with a weight shift will give maximum acceleration on the disc by getting it up to speed in a very short period of time. While it might feel like muscling the disc will give you more power, in reality it doesn't. Being that I have putted with both a muscle technique and a pitch technique, I can say this: with the muscle technique 45' putts felt very long but with the weight shift and pitch technique 45' are easily reachable and 70' putts feel long. If i jump putt i can get the disc to maintain an up and down putt line up to around 125'. It takes a lot of practice to get the timing down of the weight shift and flick but after watching the best pro putters, it seems very worthwhile to master.

    The problem is something else.
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    Putting
    My stance and form do not include a weight shift.

    Possible Causes
  • Your stance is not staggered.
  • Your right shoulder is pointed at the target.
  • You are straddle putting.


    Your stance is not staggered.
    Possible Fix:
    Maximum balance occurs with your legs staggered. The traditional putting stance has your left foot back and right foot forward. This stance allows for a rocking motion from back to front which allows for the weight shift that is the source of power for a quick pitch or flick putt. This stance should also give you tremendous balance and a solid center of gravity that you can shift. If you putt with the same type of pitch or flick that many of the top pros putt with, with the exception of the straddle putt, you should have your stance staggered in order to get the weight shift required to accelerate the disc out of your hand.


    Your right shoulder is pointed at the target.
    Possible Fix:
    Many players attempt to putt with their right shoulder pointed at the target. This allows for a long putt without a weight shift through a short "throw" motion and then the putt is released with the same push motion of a typical putt. There are a couple of problems with this technique as it is more difficult to gauge power with lots of consistency as well as the tendency to have a deep-rimmed putter stick on your hand and release to the right of where you are aiming. This stance does not allow for the straight out and up motion of a true pitch putt and thus seems to have left/right consistency problems.


    You are straddle putting.
    Possible Fix:
    Although it's not as obvious, a correct straddle putt does have a weight shift. It is quite subtle and involves more of a shifting of weight on your feet and a flexing of your legs. Longer straddle putts will require you to rock from your heels to the balls of your feet and flexing your hamstrings and calves like you are pressing your legs into the ground. This doesn't look or feel like much, but it is enough to help accelerate the disc out of your hand. As with most putting, timing is everything.

    The problem is something else.
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    Putting
    My putt doesn't feel like a quick motion.

    Possible Causes
  • You are keeping your arm slow for precision and control.
  • You are keeping your arm too stiff.


    You are keeping your arm slow for precision and control.
    Possible Fix:
    Although using a slow, deliberate technique might feel more accurate, the disc will actually hold a worse line on longer putts. As force on the disc is calculated by Mass x Acceleration, to get power on the putt you will need to accelerate the disc as quickly as possible before release. Although this might seem less accurate with more room for error, practice and development of muscle memory will help you gain consistency. Also, if you make sure that your pitch or flick is a straight out-and-up path, you should find it more consistent and more accurate over time. It is shocking to see how all putters fly almost identically when they are thrown on the right line and have the right amount of force on them.


    You are keeping your arm too stiff.
    Possible Fix:
    A stiff arm is easy to move with strength but difficult to accelerate. Your pitch or flick should be very quick and fluid. If your arm is too stiff this will be near impossible to accomplish in order to get the line you want on your putts. Try keeping your hand and wrist stiff and let the rest of your arm stay loose. This should help gain more of a quick motion on your putts and help with distance when coupled with a weight shift.

    The problem is something else.
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    Putting
    My putts keep pulling up short and left.

    Possible Causes
  • You are getting the nose up on your putts.
  • You aren't getting enough of a weight shift.
  • You are dropping your off shoulder back during your pitch.


    You are getting the nose up on your putts.
    Possible Fix:
    A nose up putt, like all other nose up shots will tend to drop left and short. There's 2 ways to think about getting the nose down on your putts. One method is to push with your thumb during the pitch. This will cause the disc to leave your hand with the last feeling of your thumb pressing the front edge down and continue to fly with a level or nose down flight path. The other method is to lift the back end of the disc while it leaves your hand. This can be accomplished by following through higher and pressing the back end of the disc slightly upwards with your finger tips. Both of these will take some practice to get a feel for and are useful in different situations.


    You aren't getting enough of a weight shift.
    Possible Fix:
    Like other throws, putts that are flying too slow will fall short and left. Force on the disc = Mass x Acceleration and in order to accelerate the disc on long putts you will need to shift your weight from back to front. A well-thrown putt with an arcing up-and-down flight path shouldn't leave you too much of a comebacker even if you miss high. If you can perfect this line you can work on weight shifts and get enough zip on the disc to make a run for the chains from very far away and not have to worry about missing a comebacker.


    You are dropping your off shoulder back during your pitch.
    Possible Fix:
    Many putters putt with their shoulders square, perpendicular to the basket. If you adopt this technique and find yourself pulling up short you may want to see what your off shoulder does during your putt. If you let it drop back and lunge forward with your throwing shoulder it is going to cost you power, distance, and accuracy. Make sure you keep em square all the way through and you'll find more disc acceleration and a cleaner release.

    The problem is something else.
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    Putting
    My putts often stick on my hand and miss to the right.


    Possible Causes
  • My putt feels like a short throw.
  • I putt with my right shoulder pointed at the basket and usually have good touch but I go through streaks of missing to the right.
  • This only happens on longer putts when I try to muscle it.


    My putt feels like a short throw.
    Possible Fix:
    Often I'm of the "if it's not broken" mentality but if your putt is like a short throw I definitely recommend changing to more of a pitch or flick putt. It will be near impossible in the long run to develop a consistent release at such a short distance low speed throw. Since the disc won't be travelling fast enough to rip out of your hand you will have to consciously let it go. Putters are also generally deep-rimmed and may be tough to release consistently. If you putt this way and find yourself missing to the right, the disc is probably catching on one of your fingers and you can either do your best to clean that up or switch to a style where that problem doesn't exist.


    I putt with my right shoulder pointed at the basket and usually have good touch but I go through streaks of missing to the right.
    Possible Fix:
    If you are putting with this style and finding a lot of success and a good putt line with it you are pusing with your palm correctly. The positives of this technique are a long putting range and good accuracy. The negatives are more of a line-drive putt line vs. an up-and-down line which will leave long comeback putts on misses and a tendency to go through streaks of missing to the right. The motion of this putt form is on a flat plane but the natural follow-through will pull to the right. The disc must also hinge a little bit to leave your hand. The bend of your elbow and such will make it difficult to push straight out all of the time and the hinge can cause grip lock issues. If you can do this putt well it will take you very little transition time to switch to a shoulder-square stance which should improve your consistency. It will take a little bit of adjustment as your putt range will decrease initially until you develop a smooth weight-shift but in the long run it should add accuracy and consistency to your putting game.


    This only happens on longer putts when I try to muscle it.
    Possible Fix:
    Longer putts will give you a tendency to try to muscle it. This will often cause a lunge of the throwing shoulder forwards and a dropping of the off shoulder backwards. Not only will this rob you of power, but it will also get your throwing shoulder pointed at the basket. The side effects of this will include a more line-drive putt line and a tendency to have the disc stick on your hand and pull to the right. If you need more distance on your putt, try to use more of a weight shift than an unbalanced lunge.

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    Putting
    My putts tend to hang in the air and I can't get them to drop.

    Possible Causes
  • You are getting the nose up on your putts.
  • You are getting more of a line-drive putt line than an arc.
  • Your putter is too light.


    You are getting the nose up on your putts.
    Possible Fix:
    A nose up putt, like all other nose up shots will tend to drop left and short. There's 2 ways to think about getting the nose down on your putts. One method is to push with your thumb during the pitch. This will cause the disc to leave your hand with the last feeling of your thumb pressing the front edge down and continue to fly with a level or nose down flight path. The other method is to lift the back end of the disc while it leaves your hand. This can be accomplished by following through higher and pressing the back end of the disc slightly upwards with your finger tips. Both of these will take some practice to get a feel for and are useful in different situations.


    You are getting more of a line-drive putt line than an arc.
    Possible Fix:
    A well executed pitch putt will give the disc a very quick and tight up-and-down arc to its flight path. Fade is virtually non-existent and the disc won't keep going too far on misses. If you are getting more of a line-drive putt line and are having trouble with the disc hanging in the air you may want to check your motion that gives the putt its power. You may also want to think about your stance. If your throwing shoulder is pointed at the goal you may want to try squaring your shoulders or straddle putting in order to force yourself to throw more of an arc line.


    Your putter is too light.
    Possible Fix:
    A lighter putter will go further with less effort. Unfortunately, if you miss or get the nose up, they will still go further, just in the wrong direction. A heavier putter, although more difficult to putt long distances, will drop out of the air more easily. If you are having a problem with your putts hanging, a heavier disc might be something to consider.

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    Putting
    I can't seem to putt when it's windy out.

    Putting in heavy wind is probably the most difficult part of disc golf. Mastering it near impossible, doing your best to tame it is within everyone's reach.

    Tips
  • A tailwind will make the disc drop faster so putt a little higher.
  • A headwind will make the disc rise and float, so putt lower.
  • A heavier disc will hold up better in windy situations.
  • If you keep the disc flat only its height will be effected by wind.
  • Don't be afraid to lay up if it is very windy out, better to take a 4 than a 6.
  • Hyzer putts will hold a better line when it's windy out.
  • Make sure your disc angle plays the wind as it will get pushed around like a kite.
  • Cross winds will push the disc if it isn't flat. Use this to your advantage when you can.
  • Stay calm and use your head. Know the safe bet and your own limitations.
  • Practice practice practice.

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    Putting
    I putt great in practice but I can't putt during the round.

    Possible Causes
  • You are afraid of missing.
  • You have stopped putting with a quick motion.
  • You have loosened your grip.


    You are afraid of missing.
    Possible Fix:
    Practice puts don't have comebackers. The fear of missing sets in often after you miss your first comebacker. The best advice I can give is not to try to run any putts outside of your makable range or with big risk/reward consequences until you are into your round and drilling your routine putts. Try not to let yourself get psyched out. There's only a few things more frustrating than having 12 consecutive putts that miss low. If you're in your range run it. Focus on the link you plan to hit and just drill it. You don't want to go overboard but you also don't want to be timid on what should be routine putts. When you line up, remember how quick your pitch should be. Remember what it feels like to have it leave your hand and drill chain. Clear your head and drill it. If you need to, write yourself a message on the top of your putter like "Nothing But Chain" or "Just Drill It." It sounds kind of hokey but you'll be surprised at what happens when that is the last thing running through your head before you fire.


    You have stopped putting with a quick motion.
    Possible Fix:
    It's easy to no-brain practice putts and drill em with the same quick pitch that you have always drilled em with. When the pressure of the round sets in, make sure you don't let yourself slow down and overthink the consequences or over think how you absolutely have to hit that pole. "Absolutely have to" shouldn't exist in your vocabulary, while "I'm going to drill it" should be echoing through you at all times. When you slow down and start thinking you slow down your arm. While using a slow, deliberate technique might feel right for the moment, the disc won't hold the line you normal throw with. Not only will it cost you accuracy, but distance as well as you won't be accelerating the disc anymore. Remember the quick flick and drill it. If you miss a putt or two and it didn't feel like your normal putt, quickly remember how your normal putt feels and execute it.


    You have loosened your grip.
    Possible Fix:
    Putting, like all other throws requires a firm grip. When the round sets in it's easy to lose track of that and let your grip go loose. This is going to result in inconsistent putts and lots of wobble. When you finish your last practice putts before the round, remember what it feels like to grip the disc in your regular putt. If you feel yourself loosening up during the round, think back to that and execute.

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